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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of National saving-investment dynamics and international capital mobility found in the catalog.

National saving-investment dynamics and international capital mobility

Florian Pelgrin

National saving-investment dynamics and international capital mobility

by Florian Pelgrin

  • 98 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Bank of Canada in [Ottawa] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Capital movements -- Econometric models.,
  • Saving and investment -- Econometric models.,
  • International finance -- Econometric models.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Florian Pelgrin and Sebastian Schich.
    SeriesBank of Canada working paper -- 2004-14, Working paper (Bank of Canada) -- 2004-14.
    ContributionsBank of Canada.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 34 p. ;
    Number of Pages34
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20140286M

    Additionally, issues related to the measurement of openness, monetary control, optimal exchange rates regimes, sequencing of reforms, and real exchange rate dynamics under different degrees of capital mobility are carefully analyzed. The book is divided into four parts after the editor's introduction. Subsequent studies have questioned whether a simple saving–investment relation truly represents the degree of capital mobility. Therefore, it may be difficult to argue that international capital mobility has increased or decreased based on the saving–investment .

    National Saving and International Investment Martin Feldstein, Philippe Bacchetta. Chapter in NBER book National Saving and Economic Performance (), B. Douglas Bernheim and John B. Shoven, editors (p. - ) Conference held January , Published in .   The finding that countries' investment rates are highly correlated with their national saving rates has been confirmed by many studies. Our interpretation of the saving-investment evidence is that the hypothesis of a high degree of substitutability for claims on physical capital located in different countries is not supported by the by:

    4. Capital Mobility with OLS Estimates 19 5. FMOLS Results 20 6. Capital Mobility with FMOLS Results 21 ations: saving-investment estimates and country size 22 8. Granger Causality from the ECMs 23 9. Short-Run OLS Estimates 24 Capital Mobility in the Short-Run 25 References   International Capital Markets and the Limits of National Economic Policy. In Financial Openness and National Autonomy: Opportunities and Constraints, edited by Banuri, Tariq and Schor, Juliet B., –Cited by:


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National saving-investment dynamics and international capital mobility by Florian Pelgrin Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper analyzes the dynamics of national saving-investment relationships to determine the degree of international capital mobility. The authors interpret the close relationship between national saving & investment in the long run as reflecting a solvency constraint, rather than as evidence of limited capital mobility.

The authors analyze the dynamics of national saving-investment relationships to determine the degree of international capital mobility. Following Coakley and Kulasi (), the authors interpret the close relationship between national saving and investment in the long run as reflecting a solvency constraint, rather than as evidence of limited capital mobility (Feldstein and Horioka ).

to infer the degree of international capital mobility from the saving–investment dynamics. By using a panel of time-series and cross-section data and testing, simultaneously, the implications of the theoretical considerations on more than one country, increased power Cited by: The authors analyze the dynamics of national saving-investment relationships to determine the degree of international capital mobility.

Following Coakley and Kulasi (), the authors interpret the close relationship between national saving and investment in the long run as reflecting a solvency constraint, rather than as evidence of limited Author: Florian Pelgrin and Sebastian Schich.

International capital mobility: What do national saving–investment dynamics tell us. Article in Journal of International Money and Finance 27(3) April with 74 Reads. Feldstein and Horioka (FH) () identify a close cross-section association between period-average data on annual national saving and investment rates for a sample of 16 OECD economies from to and interpret it as evidence of low international capital by: Our interpretation of the saving-investment evidence is that the hypothesis of a high degree of substitutability for claims on physical capital located in different countries is not supported by.

country. Hence, the study of saving-investment relationship is closely related to the degree of capital mobility. An understanding of capital mobility is important since higher capital mobility may smooth out external shocks to an economy.

Conversely, increased capital mobility may also make an economy more vulnerable to financial turbulence. approach to the current account placed international capital mobility and dynamics at center stage in open-economy macromodels. Section II is an 1The most elaborate exposition-cum-interpretation of the Mundell-Fleming framework is offered by Frenkel and Razin ().

2The postwar period is coterminous with the history of the International MonetaryFile Size: KB. Public Debt, Saving-Investment-Current Account Dynamics, and Capital Mobility in OECD countries,S.

AmirKhalkhali, A. Dar Abstract. Financial Development and Economic Growth in advanced and developing economies over the period –, Doumbia, D. Abstract. this controversial finding, the saving-investment dynamics and international capital mobility becomes a subject of intense research over the last two decades.

On any reasonable ground of present context, it can be well evident that the increased global market integration is synonymous with the argument of increased capital mobility.

Get this from a library. National saving-investment dynamics and international capital mobility. [Florian Pelgrin; Bank of Canada.].

Saving-Investment Correlation and International Capital Mobility* M. Taslim Department of Economics University of New England Armidale NSW *An earlier version of this paper was presented at a session of the Annual Conference of Economic Society of Australia at the Gold Coast, SeptemberThe author wishes to thank the.

saving-investment correlations and capital mobility in developing countries with special reference to india benu schneider july, indian council for research on international economic relations core-6a, 4th floor, india habitat centre, lodi road, new dlehi File Size: KB.

SAVING, INVESTMENT AND INTERNATIONAL CAPITAL MOBILITY IN EC COUNTRIES Isabel Argimon and Jose M Roldan (*) .) The authors are grateful to J.

Dolado for his help and advice and to J. Oelrieu. Gonzalez­ PAramo, A. Marcet. Marin. Perez and J. Vega for their comments ands suggestions. SERVICIO DE ESTUDIOS. The authors analyze the dynamics of national saving–investment relationships to determine the degree of international capital mobility.

Following Coakley and Kulasi (), the authors interpret the close relationship between national saving and investment in the long run as reflecting a solvency constraint, rather than as evidence of limited capital mobility (Feldstein and Horioka ).Cited by: Moreno R [] Saving–investment dynamics and capital mobility in the US and Japan.

Journal of International Money and Finance, 16, – Crossref, ISI, Google Scholar; Murphy R [] Capital mobility and the relationship between saving and investment in OECD countries.

Journal of International Money and Finance, 3, –Author: Smruti Ranjan Behera. The Saving-Investment Relationship. As discussed in Section IV of Part Two, if capital were perfectly mobile among countries, changes in domestic investment would be independent of changes in nationalthe importance of national saving for investment depends on the degree of international capital mobility.

32 Table 4 suggests a close association between national saving and domestic. International Macroeconomics: Beyond the Mundell-Fleming Model MAURICE OBSTFELD* the current account placed international capital mobility and dynamics at center stage in open-economy macromodels.

Section II is an overview of the behavior of INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS: BEYOND THE MUNDELL-FLEMING MODEL. If capital is indeed very mobile, the relationship between saving and investment should be weak and conversely, if capital is rather immobile, investment rates should correspond closely to saving rates.

Increasing capital mobility across countries is an important phenomenon for Cited by: 6. Economic historians have been concerned with the evolution of international capital markets over the long run, but empirical testing of market integration has been limited.

This paper augments the literature by investigating long- and short-run criteria for capital mobility using time-series and cross-section analysis of saving-investment.This paper investigates the degree of financial integration and international capital mobility by analysing the dynamics of national saving-investment relationships.

We interpret the relationship between national saving and investment in the long run as reflecting a solvency constraint and focus on the short-term saving-investment relationship to assess the degree of capital by: 6.

If perfect capital mobility does not exist, then differences among the country’s investment rates should correspond to differences in its respective saving rates.

Thus, by comparing the correlations between domestic saving and investment rates in various countries, one can determine the degree of capital by: 1.